Tough Mudder Training – 7 Things You Need to Focus On

So, you’ve taken the plunge and decided to challenge yourself in the infamous mud race, Tough Mudder, either for the first time or have returned for more punishment. Congratulations, you’re going to be in for a heck of a lot of fun, but ensuring that your Tough Mudder training is on point will heighten your enjoyment ten-fold.

Your trainer today is “Mr Obstacle Course”, himself – Stuart Amory.

Here are seven area’s that you need to focus on in your training for this intense obstacle course.

 

7 areas to excel in your Tough Mudder training

Plan for the race

Is it accurate to say that you are sufficiently fit to cover the 10-12 miles required to finish the gruelling obstacle race? In the event that you are, that’s awesome but, and I imagine this will be most of you, if not then you have to utilize your time carefully. You’ll need to have the capacity to run a half marathon in light of the fact that the slopes and other obstacles are likely to inflict significant fatigue on your way to the finish line.

It’s fine and dandy to have your general fitness in order but your legs need to be ready to propel your pecs and guns around the entire course.

In keeping with the social aspect of Tough Mudder, join a running club or begin going to free weekly coordinated park run’s  or in a recreation center close to you. Keep chipping away at this and you’ll accordingly enhance your fitness, time and enjoyment on the course.

 

Embrace HIIT training – don’t run before you can walk, do both.

If this is your second go-round, break down your past Tough Mudder and consider where you needed to walk or were truly drained. It may have been the slopes, as it is for so many, so stroll up them and stay relaxed with your breathing. A run/walk technique can work wonders in this case and allow you to finish with a strong run to the finish flag because of the way you strategically gave your body rest.

Amid a current Ironman Triathlon, I ran the marathon toward the end utilizing a 8 minute run/2 min walk methodology, this was engrained in me when I began running – I knew I had a rest coming up in under 8 minutes. This not only helps physically, but mentally too.

 

tough mudder training

 

Control your breathing despite the obstacles

In the event, controlling your breathing will imperative to your personal success. Keep your breathing deep to keep the oxygen levels in your body steady and refilled. When you see a big incline coming, endeavor to take deep, fuller breaths before scaling it. Charging up your oxygen levels like this will mean you’re less inclined to be panting for air early into the climb.

To train for this, take a stab at climbing stairs and holding your breath. Recuperate, then attempt again, but this time perform 60 seconds of deep breaths before you handle the stairs. You’ll see that this time, the stairs were much less demanding with the pre-drawn breaths.

 

Eat while being a Tough Mudder

The body can store glucose for around 90 mins of activity. Bad news. A Tough Mudder goes longer than that so you’ll have to carry something to give you a boost or plan to correctly refuel at the many stops en route.

In an ordinary marathon you’ll require anywhere between 25-60 grams of carbs every hour so pick up the Nectar Fuel Cells from Tough Mudder’ sponsors, For Goodness Shakes, to guide you to the end in style and with some left in the tank.

 

Tough Mudder is social – practice and prepare with companions

Tough Mudder is about collaboration and there’s no need for Tough Mudder training to be done alone either. Tough Mudder has launched competitive waves for you to have a go at with your group, however this means you’ll need to be out to improve as a group rather than reinforcing your slowest teammate.

The explanation behind this is that your strongest individuals will be performing a greater amount of the lifting, pushing and heaving so cooperating will enable you to beat your course record or set a strong one for you first-timers.

 

Monkey around and increase your grip

 

tough mudder training

 

Go to a park or playground and work on hanging or pull ups on the different bars accessible to you.

Practicing the ‘Farmer’s Walk’ is likewise an awesome approach to build your holding power. Grab two heavy dumbbells or kettlebells, stick your shoulders back and take a stroll (it won’t feel like one, trust me) as far as you can without dropping them or taking a breather. Up the weight or distance and progress over time.

Climbing is additionally an incredible approach to speed yourself over any obstacles as you’ll wind up noticeably better able to move your body better. Not to mention, climbing is a very fun way to get fit.

 

Ensure you’ve got the right equipment for Tough Mudder

Footwear is the area where many stumble, pun intended, as you’ll be needing a trail type of trainer for an optimum race. Merrell have released the ideal line for a Tough Mudder course and they’ll enable you to remain on your feet while others are laying flat with muddy faces.

It might appear glaringly evident but easily overlooked – keep away from cotton shirts as it’s critical that you don’t wear garments that hold water due to the expanded weight. It’ll suck water up like a sponge and you want to remain as light as possible. Additionally, you’ll inevitably end up cold out on the course if you’re holding on to freezing water in your shirt.

Dress for the climate so be ready to layer up or simply wear a vest. This ought to be figured out ahead of time and is easily done with the different weather apps accessible on your smart phone. Long sleeves or leggings are regularly used to limit cuts, bumps and bruises (or OCR Kisses which they’re tenderly known by Obstacle Course Racers – have a look for the hashtag OCRKisses to see what I’m talking about)

For Goodness Shakes will deliver protein and energy drinks & supplements to Mudders at all 19 Tough Mudder events across the UK and Ireland for the next two years.

For more articles on Tough Mudder training, nutrition tips, and workouts, get TRAIN magazine direct into your inbox every month for free by signing up to our newsletter

 

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