Fitness

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                    [post_content] => Overtraining is a bit of a fitness buzzword inciting opinions aplenty – and there’s a fine line between pushing yourself hard enough and knowing when to back off.

Treading this line is really part of the secret of being a good coach and athlete. Overtraining happens when continuous training is carried out without suffcient recovery to the point where sporting performance decreases.

It’s linked with immune suppression, glycogen depletion, performance incompetence and negative impacts on mood and there are a few theories of how overtraining syndrome manifests itself.

They are:

 

1. The glycogen system theory

This suggests that in a glycogendepleted state you have increased oxidation, an increased breakdown of BCAAs from muscle tissue, increased production of stress hormones and higher levels of 5HT, a precursor to serotonin, which then makes you tired. Energy balance is a cornerstone to remaining robust and well recovered. The solution is to keep an eye on your intake and expenditure, making sure if it’s at a deficit, you don’t run it too hard for too long.  

2. The oxidative stress theory

This proposes excessive training overwhelms the body’s antioxidant defense mechanisms. Increased oxidation increases inflammation, which in turn increases muscle fatigue and slower recovery. The solution is to eat foods that support antioxidant enzyme systems (berries, pecan nuts and dark chocolate) while cycling training to avoid repeated stress areas. Also, training smart with short, higher intensity sessions, rather than plodding along for hours.  

3. The central system theory

This is when your central nervous system (CNS) gets depleted and you lose your ability to produce stress hormones in response to training or other stressors. In the short term, this involves displacement of BCAAs, increasing 5HT uptake into the brain. In the longer term it involves adrenal hypofunction and dysregulation of the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, which is how your brain talks to the adrenals. There’s contention around different types of CNS overtraining, but some experts suggest endurance training leads to sympathetic burnout and weights and power training leads to parasympathetic burnout. In both situations the answer is to cut volume while keeping intensity, increase rest days and use plant-based compounds.  

4. The cytokine theory

Here we focus on the system imbalance where adaptation through tissue healing and strengthening happens thanks to the activation of local inflammatory response and recruitment of cytokines (part of your immune system that’s usually pro-inflammatory). Stress increases cytokine levels, causing depression-like symptoms.  

So, how can you fight overtraining?

Up your fish oils intake, eat more herbs and spices and supplement with ZMA, curcumin, boswellia, resveratrol and quercetin. You should also eat more vitamin D-rich foods and boost your immune system with reishi mushrooms. Sleeping and chilling out should help, too. Specific nutrients such as colostrum and probiotics can also improve your digestive health and immune system functioning during periods of high stress and higher intensity training. How do you know if you’re overtraining? A new stressor may arrive which you don’t factor in and something will have to give to allow you suffcient time to shift into the parasympathetic recovery mode so you regenerate and repair properly. [post_title] => Overtraining: What It Is And How To Avoid It [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => what-overtraining-is-and-how-to-avoid-it [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-24 17:00:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-24 17:00:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://trainmag.wpengine.com/?p=3910 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3969 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2016-12-08 12:00:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-08 12:00:38 [post_content] => Not every training problem has a tried-and tested solution, but there’s always a way to plan around even the most confusing of issues.  

1. How much muscle can I build without steroids?

There have been a few attempts to establish how much muscle you can build without chemicals, but the most well-researched is the Fat Free Mass Index, which plugs your height, weight and fat percentage into a slightly complicated formula [Google it – Ed] to give you your FFMI. According to studies comparing drug-free bodybuilders with steroid users, the upper limit is around 25. That said, quite a few 1950s bodybuilders beat those numbers when designer steroids basically didn’t exist.  

2. What's the perfect squat form?

Head forward or down? Toes straight or slightly out? Shoulder-width stance, wider, or narrower? A glance at the different styles of half a dozen pros should be enough to convince anyone that there’s no single ‘best’ option, only what works for your leg-length and muscle distribution. If you’re lifting for a specific goal, base your style on that. If you’re going for all-out strength, experiment to see what lets you lift the most, and work with that. Just don’t round your back – that’s standard across all lifters.  

3. How much recovery do I really need?

Sometimes, you can train hard six days a week and still feel ready to get after it on Sunday; other days, two sets of curls leave you ready for bed. Sets, reps and rest all contribute to just how stressful a workout is, but you also need to consider your age and the types of moves you’re doing (eccentric-heavy workouts are harder to recover from). Finally, the aspect you might not have considered is psychological stress: if it’s a tough week at work, it might not be quite the time for that Russian squat plan.  

4. What's the perfect tempo?

Four… Three… Two… And squeeeeze. If you’re doing every rep like this, well, you’re not wrong, but you also might not be working hard enough. “Time under tension certainly helps for building muscle,” says trainer James Adamson. “But if you’re able to count every rep perfectly, are you really going all out?” Your alternative method: disregard overcomplicated 4020-style prescriptions, and think of reps as ‘fast’ or ‘slow’. Simplicity is often the best answer.  

5. How much of my gym performance is in my head?

To be fair, dozens of studies have attempted to answer exactly this question, from ‘to failure’ tests, where rugby players were tasked with all-out efforts on a bike, followed by a short sprint with no recovery (proving that your brain almost always keeps something back, even if you think you’re going full blast), to studies where researchers yelled at subjects on while they exercised (result: you almost always go faster if someone shouts at you). You’re never going to get an exact answer, but the key takeaways are constant: music, focus and competition will push you beyond what you thought was possible.  

6. How much running mileage should I put in?

Consistency is key, so a few months of injury-free training beats a few weeks of all-out sessions, followed by crippling shin splints. If you’re running for health, though, things are more clear-cut – several studies, including one published this year by the Mayo Clinic, suggest that moderate weekly mileage is the most beneficial for health, with benefits starting to taper or shift into reverse as distances creep up. Your best bet: train for a 5k, not a marathon – you’ll get more health benefits with less investment and injury.  

7. Should I skip breakfast?

A 2007 study done on the one-meal-a-day Warrior Diet suggests that packing your daily intake into fewer meals can burn fat while preserving lean muscle. The biggest problem? Appetite. How successful you’ll be with no breakfast depends on how you cope running on fumes; if you can make it to lunch on nothing but green tea and a couple of BCAA tablets then stick with it.  

8. What's the perfect warm-up?

There’s little evidence about what works, so focus on what doesn’t. A study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, found warming of the specific muscles used in the day’s training leads to better performance than just trying to raise your core temp. Find something that gets you in the right mindset to train hard, too. That’s the most important muscle that you need to get ready.  

9. What's the best for building my chest?

Dumbbell bench pressing, for instance, might activate more motor units in the pec muscles at a certain weight than barbell benching, but does that mean dumbbells are more effective for building your chest? Well, maybe, except that muscular recruitment differs substantially from person to person. You’ll still need to experiment to see what works for you.  

10. How many times a day should I eat?

Ah, the classic. The old bodybuilder prescription of six-small-meals-a-day was flawed. More sensible, according to Precision Nutrition’s Brian St Pierre, is asking how often eating is practical. “Most of our clients get on best with three meals and a snack, or protein shake,” he says. “But if you’re covering all your bases and your current frequency isn’t working for you, try switching it up.”  

11. Does nutrient timing matter?

You know the theory: eating according to when you train helps you perform better, get leaner and look healthier. It seems to be that your overall intake by day matters most, and that the rest varies by individual. If you’re not sure which approach to take, try both and track your results. If your lifestyle means one option’s more manageable than the other, stick with that.  

12. Is 'the pump' worth it?

The pump is when your muscles fill up with blood faster than it can be cleared from the area, making them temporarily look larger. For decades, the benefits were based on bro-science, but now there’s evidence that the increased bloodflow transports oxygen and nutrients to the muscle, suggesting that the effect isn’t just in your head. For the best reason to chase the pump, it’s worth asking Arnold. “When you are pumped up, you feel stronger and it’s easier to motivate yourself to train hard and achieve high intensity,” says the Governator. “Sometimes you will walk into the gym and feel lazy but you will get a fantastic pump after a few minutes and suddenly feel energetic.” Sold!   Find fitness tips and inspiration and more in every issue of TRAIN magazine. [post_title] => 12 Fitness Questions That Probably Can't Be Answered [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 12-fitness-questions-that-probably-can-t-be-answered [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-27 11:37:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-27 11:37:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://trainmag.wpengine.com/?p=3969 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4061 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2016-09-22 12:00:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-22 12:00:40 [post_content] => Want to get in shape? First, make sure the numbers add up. Here’s every equation you need to fine-tune your training…  

1. Body fat arithmetic

Leave the fat-burning zone to infomercial presenters: for highspeed fat loss, short and nasty is (unfortunately) the way forward. EPOC, or Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption, means short, intense intervals will leave you burning fat for hours after you train. It’s usually measured with specialist lab equipment, but there’s also a formula for figuring it out, based on how much oxygen 158 athletes burned after exercise lasting anywhere between two minutes and three hours. ePOC (t) = f(EPOC(t-1), exercise_ intensity(t), dt) Confused? Don’t be. Essentially, the higher-intensity your exercise, the longer (and higher) the burn. Try it with 10-20-30 training, which University Of Copenhagen researchers discovered to improve performance and health. To do this, run (or row or bike) at a moderate pace for 30 seconds, pick it up slightly for another 20 seconds, then go all-out for a final 10. Repeat four times, rest for two minutes, and then do the whole thing again. You’ll burn fat all day – no slick heart-rate monitor required.  

2. Muscle math

Your 1-rep max (1RM) comes in handy for working out what weights to use during regular training sessions. To find it, use this equation, plugging in a weight you can only handle for 10 reps or less. You should get within 2-3kg of your true max, sans the stress of busting your shoulders on one rep. weight used x (reps done x 0.33 + 1) = your 1RM Next, settle on a set/rep count for the day. Use Soviet sports scientist A S Prilepin’s figures for building strength (below) to design your sessions: pick a per cent of your 1RM to lift, then decide how many reps you’re going to aim for in each set. The “optimal” number is the ideal rep-range for strength: fewer won’t cause your body to adapt, but more will over stress you. Percent of 1RM     Reps/Set        Optimal total reps 55-65                      3-6                   24 70-80                      3-6                   18 80-90                      2-4                   15 90+                         1-2                     4 If you’re about to bench 80kg, say, and your 1RM is 100kg, you might want to aim for 4 reps per set – in which case you’d do 4 sets in total (rounding up slightly) – or 2 reps per set, and do 7 or 8 sets. Rest as needed to do all your sets, and let the gains begin…  

3. Fluid dynamics

It may feel great after a workout on a hot day, but does throwing a bucket of ice cold water over you actually cool you down? Yes, according to researchers at the University Of Sydney’s Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory. They say by drinking a just-above-freezing 250ml cup of water, you’ll lose nine calories of heat, while the pour-and-evaporate method can disperse up to 145. For best results, use a mix of both. (9 x D) + (145 x P) = temp loss Do you need to rehydrate better after the gym? Weigh yourself before and after a session where you don’t drink any water. The difference is your “sweat rate”, or how much you should drink during workouts for optimum performance. Add a ¼ tsp of table salt for a home-made electrolyte boost. (Pre-BW - Post-BW) x 1,000 = your in-gym H²0 intake  

4. Calculus of creatine

Creatine is the backup generator for your muscles: it lets you lift heavier and harder for short intervals. Most firms recommend a “loading” phase, then a “maintenance” protocol – it’s not strictly necessary, but it will get you results quicker. Here’s your new regime (creatine sucks up water, so remember to stay well hydrated): Loading: Take 0.3g/kg bodyweight for 5-7 days. Maintenance: Then take 5g daily for 3-4 weeks  

5. Vitamin D

Getting enough rays? Well, 10 minutes a day is all your body needs to synthesise vitamin D in the summer but – according to research from the US National Institute of Health – there isn’t enough UVB radiation in the upper latitude’s winter sunshine to get the job done. So supplement with up to 1,000IU a day – less if you’re out in the sun. 1,000IU + 10 mins of sun = your vit D intake  

6. Feel the tension

Instead of worrying about 6 reps vs 12, think about how long you’re spending on your set. In a Journal of Physiology study, increasing the “time under tension” for leg extensions upped post-exercise protein synthesis, meaning more muscle. “Aim for 60 seconds per set,” explains trainer James Adamson. “So if you’re doing 10 reps, four seconds down, two up is a good choice.” reps x tempo = time under tension  

7. Number nutrition

Bulking and cutting? So last decade. A new McMasters University study has confirmed that you can lose fat and build muscle at the same time… if you eat enough protein. Men who trained six times a week lost an average of 5kg of fat while adding about 1kg of muscle – but only if they stuck to a high-protein diet, defined as 2.4g per kg of bodyweight, per day. 2.4 x BW = your improved protein intake  

8. Living to a prime number

Sit on the floor. Stand up. Now the tricky bit: do it without using your hands, knees or forearms. Flexibility, balance and muscle strength are key predictors of longevity, and this mini-test, created by Brazilian doctor Claudio Gil Araujo, assesses all three. Your “score” starts at 10: subtract 1 point for each support you use, and 0.5 for every loss of balance. If you’re sub-eight, it’s cause for concern, so fix it with the goblet squat. “Hold a kettlebell, dumbbell or heavy rucksack in front of your chest, then sit down into a squat until your knees touch your elbows,” says Adamson. “Do five reps, then hold the fifth at the bottom and push your knees apart with your elbows for five seconds. Repeat twice.” Don’t worry, it gets easier. 10 - L - (B x 0.5) > 8  

9. Get a very good grip

Here’s one good reason to get a grip, as well as creating a good first impression when you shake hands: it’s a key predictor of lifespan. According to a study published in The Lancet, every 5kg decrease in grip strength in test subjects was linked to a 16% increase in mortality rate, suggesting that it “might be a particularly good marker of underlying aging processes.” Don’t just grab a set of handgrippers, though – the researchers theorized that grip is successful as an overall predictor of mortality, meaning that you need to focus on full-body gains for the full benefit. Deadlifts will cover every base – hit them up once a week to add more weeks to your grand total. Grip strength = predictor of life   Find tips and inspiration and more in every issue of TRAIN magazine. [post_title] => The 9 Fitness Formulas You Really Need In Your Life [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => the-nine-formulas-you-really-need-in-your-life [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-27 11:38:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-27 11:38:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://trainmag.wpengine.com/?p=4061 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4216 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2016-03-23 12:00:58 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-03-23 12:00:58 [post_content] => The voice of the UFC, comedian, actor martial artist and podcast pioneer reveals the physical and mental philosophies for life and working out.  

TRAIN: Do you feel like a comedian who works as a commentator or vice versa?

"I feel like a human being who’s been very fortunate to be able to do what he loves and make a living. It’s certainly two different jobs, creating comedy, putting it together and performing it live; there’s definitely a difference between doing that and commentary. I’m just very blessed that I can enjoy doing both so my jobs never feel like a chore. There’s never a time when the UFC card starts and I wish I were somewhere else. I get very excited, it’s 100% organic and I don’t have to force it – I’m a real fan."  

Some comedians can suffer from angst. How about you?

"I certainly did, yeah, and I think that leads one to try and prove oneself as a competitor and martial artist. They’re strangely related, but comedy almost is a martial art for dealing with nonphysical life. Comedy defines and looks at the absurdities of things to create a method for avoiding damage – very much like jiu-jitsu. Anything that involves great attention to detail and a lot of technical knowledge, a lot of it comes from an unbalanced place. "For fighters and comedians it comes from not feeling loved, it’s usually what drives the craziest ones. There’s a massive need to prove themselves. However, it’s not always that. Lots of fighters had happy homes they just grew up and loved that more than anything so it’s not a hard fast rule. But there are a lot of people who are comedians and fighters in that business so in that sense they’re very connected."  

What are the big divides surrounding MMA going mainstream?

"There’ll always be people who don’t like boxing, who don’t like martial arts and think it’s violent and kids will be using it at school, but they won’t have competed or know the true essence of it. Outside of war there’s nothing scarier than MMA. People don’t understand that this is a test of will, strength, technique and preparation. It’s the human pushed to his limitations in hand-to-hand combat."  

What is your sporting motto?

"I don’t really have one, but I think sport should be about elevating your human potential. I play high-level pool and when you play really well, when your body’s in tune, there’s a deep sense of accomplishment because you controlled your body with your mind. You aim with your hand but controlled it with your mind, your focus. You can’t even be slightly off if you want that ball to hit in the pocket with a satisfying slap. The average person most likely won’t figure out how to do that, but when you do, you elevate your character. "There’s a great quote from a Samurai Miyamoto Musashi, author of The Book of Five Rings, who wrote that once you understand the way broadly you can see it in all things. I think when you get really good at anything you understand what it’s like to excel and you see things to their highest potential. And this aids you in other areas in life and to have more confidence."   Find celebrity interviews, fitness tips and more in every issue of TRAIN magazine.  [post_title] => Joe Rogan: Fitness Q&A [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => fitness-q-a-w-joe-rogan [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-24 12:13:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-24 12:13:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://trainmag.wpengine.com/?p=4216 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 4148 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2016-02-17 12:00:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-17 12:00:24 [post_content] => When sidelined with an injury Kris Gethin went from muscle building to endurance training. Here’s how he improved his fitness and recovery rate by getting his body ready for one of the toughest races on the planet. I completely turned my training on its head after a snowboarding wipeout tore my hamstring and pec minor. I’m a very active person, so following the injury I knew I’d have to have some sort of fitness goal I could aim for during rehab, but obviously lifting weights was out of the question. I also knew I’d be bored if I did just one thing, like cycling or swimming, so I decided to train for a triathlon and went on a zero-protein diet to shed the muscle, which takes up a lot of oxygen. Below are some of the valuable lessons I learned along the way.  

The hard years

While rehabbing, a lot of my training was core stability work, sprints, long-distance runs and hill runs. I quickly noticed an improvement in my running drills so I started wearing weighted vests to make things harder. My thinking was that when it came to do the triathlon I’d find it easier. When swimming, I’d put a float between my legs so I could use only my upper body, and I started training three hours a day as opposed to the 35-45 minutes I’d usually spend in the weights room as a bodybuilder.  

Measured eating

I took away all my first-class proteins like steak, poultry and fish. The only thing I did have were protein powders with some pineapple, berries and Greek yogurt, because I knew they’d really fuel my workouts. My fruits, carbs and fats increased drastically to make sure I had dense calories and hormonal reproduction from the fats so I could stay mentally focused and energized. I was also taking a lot of antioxidants because I was building up a lot of free radical damage. Plus, I drank a lot of coconut water to rehydrate.  

Ready, set, go

Eventually it was time to compete, and as soon as the gun went off I focused on slow and controlled breathing to keep my heart rate and adrenaline low. Surprisingly, I was in the top 10 after the swim, and next came the cycling – my strongest of the three events. Within two miles I had the lead and I often wondered if I’d taken a wrong turn because no one caught up to me – until the very end of the run when I was passed by one of the more experienced triathletes. For the following week I experienced DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) like I’d never felt before, but I felt happy and content knowing I’d given it my all.  

Enjoying the lighter side of life

While training for the triathlon I felt like a teenager again, so much more energized. And now I’m back into bodybuilding, following my rehab, I’m living-proof that even when you’re ‘bulking’, doing high-intensity cardio helps with recovery. You see, one thing I did learn was that when you watch Tour De France competitors sprinting over the finish line, they suffer a huge lactic acid build-up but then have to hit the mountains the very next day. One of things they do to speed up their recovery is to jump straight on a static bike for 20-25 minutes before drinking a recovery shake. This helps flush out the lactic acid and reduces inflammation. This is something I’ve applied to my weight training, replacing the stationary bike with high-intensity cardio in the form of a run once a day. Even though I’m currently the heaviest I’ve ever been, I’ve never felt healthier. I don’t get joint ache or shin splints and I’m not out of breath all the time. I train with a lot of intensity, limited rest periods and I’m still able to bang through the workouts much easier now.   Find celebrity interviews, workouts and more in every issue of TRAIN magazine.  [post_title] => Kris Gethin: From Bodybuilder To Triathlete [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => kris-gethin-bodybuilder-to-triathlete [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-23 17:05:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-23 17:05:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://trainmag.wpengine.com/?p=4148 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 5 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 3910 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2016-12-16 12:00:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-16 12:00:41 [post_content] => Overtraining is a bit of a fitness buzzword inciting opinions aplenty – and there’s a fine line between pushing yourself hard enough and knowing when to back off. Treading this line is really part of the secret of being a good coach and athlete. Overtraining happens when continuous training is carried out without suffcient recovery to the point where sporting performance decreases. It’s linked with immune suppression, glycogen depletion, performance incompetence and negative impacts on mood and there are a few theories of how overtraining syndrome manifests itself. They are:  

1. The glycogen system theory

This suggests that in a glycogendepleted state you have increased oxidation, an increased breakdown of BCAAs from muscle tissue, increased production of stress hormones and higher levels of 5HT, a precursor to serotonin, which then makes you tired. Energy balance is a cornerstone to remaining robust and well recovered. The solution is to keep an eye on your intake and expenditure, making sure if it’s at a deficit, you don’t run it too hard for too long.  

2. The oxidative stress theory

This proposes excessive training overwhelms the body’s antioxidant defense mechanisms. Increased oxidation increases inflammation, which in turn increases muscle fatigue and slower recovery. The solution is to eat foods that support antioxidant enzyme systems (berries, pecan nuts and dark chocolate) while cycling training to avoid repeated stress areas. Also, training smart with short, higher intensity sessions, rather than plodding along for hours.  

3. The central system theory

This is when your central nervous system (CNS) gets depleted and you lose your ability to produce stress hormones in response to training or other stressors. In the short term, this involves displacement of BCAAs, increasing 5HT uptake into the brain. In the longer term it involves adrenal hypofunction and dysregulation of the hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis, which is how your brain talks to the adrenals. There’s contention around different types of CNS overtraining, but some experts suggest endurance training leads to sympathetic burnout and weights and power training leads to parasympathetic burnout. In both situations the answer is to cut volume while keeping intensity, increase rest days and use plant-based compounds.  

4. The cytokine theory

Here we focus on the system imbalance where adaptation through tissue healing and strengthening happens thanks to the activation of local inflammatory response and recruitment of cytokines (part of your immune system that’s usually pro-inflammatory). Stress increases cytokine levels, causing depression-like symptoms.  

So, how can you fight overtraining?

Up your fish oils intake, eat more herbs and spices and supplement with ZMA, curcumin, boswellia, resveratrol and quercetin. You should also eat more vitamin D-rich foods and boost your immune system with reishi mushrooms. Sleeping and chilling out should help, too. Specific nutrients such as colostrum and probiotics can also improve your digestive health and immune system functioning during periods of high stress and higher intensity training. How do you know if you’re overtraining? A new stressor may arrive which you don’t factor in and something will have to give to allow you suffcient time to shift into the parasympathetic recovery mode so you regenerate and repair properly. [post_title] => Overtraining: What It Is And How To Avoid It [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => what-overtraining-is-and-how-to-avoid-it [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-24 17:00:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-24 17:00:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://trainmag.wpengine.com/?p=3910 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 5 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => 1 [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 1ae7f2a0883b2d9b23b17a27820ded8e [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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